main | about us | download | faq | readings | blogs | support | tutorial | *


    Tutorial Contents
  1. Introduction

  2. Samples & Instructions
  3. A Simple Example
  4. ABS Brake Example
  5. A Business Example
  6. Conclusions


The Design of an ABS Brake
PSM32 and DSM Tutorial

This example presumes that, either,

1) you have downloaded our samples database or,

2) have followed the instruction for downloading and installing the examples (see the table of contents to the left).

Now we must select the brake problem. Click on Manage Problems (Control+O).

TB_OPEN.gif (24459 bytes)

In the Set column of the box that appears, double click on Brake. Then click on Zoom Out Full (Shift+F8) as follows..

 TB_ZOOM.gif (24463 bytes)

This brings up the problem and sizes it to the screen as shown below.

This is a real problem taken from the work of Thomas Black at Delco.  The problem is actually part of a much larger problem that would be too large to be useful as an example.

The picture below shows what the main grid would look like (the captions are too small to read, but if you are following along in PSM, you can adjust the captions in PSM itself to be easily readable).

Now we partition the matrix by clicking on the Partition All (Control+A) icon as follows:

 TB_PART.gif (24463 bytes)

Partitioned

Now we have a block of size 12 on the diagonal.  All marks are now either within the block or below the diagonal.

Looking at just the block below, the green cell with the 5 in it shows where we will use an assumption, i.e., tear. as indicated by setting the mark in that cell to a number higher than 0, in this case 5

 

From this tearing of the block, we can see that if one assumes what the Rotor Material and the Front Lining materials are, then the design problem breaks into two design problems. One of the remaining blocks concerns the kinematics. The other block concerns the thermodynamics. Thus, given this assumption, two groups of engineers can be working in parallel to shorten the design time.

We also tear the smaller blocks using lower numbers numbers to signify the tears

Now, marks below the diagonal show the ideal plan if all assumptions were correct.
Marks above diagonal show assumptions and control reviews and iterations.

These tears as seen in the original view and ordering appear as follows:

Abs6.gif (43079 bytes)

Next: A Business Example

TB_OPEN.gif (24459 bytes)

In the Set column of the box that appears, double click on Brake. Then click on Zoom Out Full (Shift+F8) as follows..

 TB_ZOOM.gif (24463 bytes)

This brings up the problem and sizes it to the screen as shown below.

This is a real problem taken from the work of Thomas Black at Delco.  The problem is actually part of a much larger problem that would be too large to be useful as an example.

The picture below shows what the main grid would look like (the captions are too small to read, but if you are following along in PSM, you can adjust the captions in PSM itself to be easily readable).

Now we partition the matrix by clicking on the Partition All (Control+A) icon as follows:

 TB_PART.gif (24463 bytes)

Partitioned

Now we have a block of size 12 on the diagonal.  All marks are now either within the block or below the diagonal.

Looking at just the block below, the green cell with the 5 in it shows where we will use an assumption, i.e., tear. as indicated by setting the mark in that cell to a number higher than 0, in this case 5

 

From this tearing of the block, we can see that if one assumes what the Rotor Material and the Front Lining materials are, then the design problem breaks into two design problems. One of the remaining blocks concerns the kinematics. The other block concerns the thermodynamics. Thus, given this assumption, two groups of engineers can be working in parallel to shorten the design time.

We also tear the smaller blocks using lower numbers numbers to signify the tears

Now, marks below the diagonal show the ideal plan if all assumptions were correct.
Marks above diagonal show assumptions and control reviews and iterations.

These tears as seen in the original view and ordering appear as follows:

Abs6.gif (43079 bytes)

Next: A Business Example

 


Updated: 7/07/2004


main | about us | download | faq | readings | blogs | support | tutorial | *



Problematics Ideas!
1995-2015 Problematics

Contact us via email at: sales@problematics.com



| Site Design by Wonderlane Studios |